RALLYING FOR DEMOCRACY – Your fellow citizens were out some 50-strong on Commercial Avenue and 13th Street in Anacortes from noon to 1 p.m. Jan. 6. They were all for voting rights. They were against stealing elections. 	                                                                          – Photo by Ken Stern
RALLYING FOR DEMOCRACY – Your fellow citizens were out some 50-strong on Commercial Avenue and 13th Street in Anacortes from noon to 1 p.m. Jan. 6. They were all for voting rights. They were against stealing elections. – Photo by Ken Stern

Some 50 Skagitonians brought their flags, their signs and their concern for the present and future state of democracy in this country to the intersection of Commercial Avenue and 13th Street in Anacortes last Thursday. The preprinted signs read “Remember Jan. 6. Senators Protect Our Democracy Now.” 

As across the country, citizens on Commercial Avenue gathered in recognition of and against the attempted Jan. 6, 2021 riot summed up by an Associated Press reporter writing last Thursday: “The violent storming of the Capitol by Donald Trump supporters bent on upending the election of Joe Biden.” The story pointed out that while there is deep division and “a disparity in memory,” the facts are clear. Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky said on the floor of the U.S. Senate Jan. 6, 2021, “They tried to disrupt our democracy. They failed.”

“More than 700 people have been charged with crimes associated with the Capitol breach” Seattle Times reporter Jim Brunner wrote in his Jan. 6 story.

Steven Jones, involved with Fidalgo Democrats, signed up for this rally at MoveOn.com and encouraged others. It was a group of elders, mostly gray hairs. Their signs looked back, “Stop the Lies;” “Trump Lost / Get Over It;” “There is no right to Sedition.” Other signs pointed toward changing the future: “Pass Voting Rights Now.”

Another Seattle Times story noted that 335 Jan. 6 vigils were listed on the “We the People: January 6th Day of Remembrance and Action” website, including one “all by itself, in Chewelah, in Eastern Washington.”